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Natural Bridge Photo credits

In Podcast #13 the Virginia Trekkers went to one of Virginia’s most famous sites, the Natural Bridge.  It is located in the Valley & Ridge region.   We travelled here on the same day as our Roanoke podcast (#12) so this is actually part two of that podcast. Learn how the natural bridge formed through erosion, see where George Washington carved his initials in the rock, and then travel back with us to the Roanoke star to see how it looks at night and discover whether it is made of parallel circuits or series circuits.  Come on, let’s go trekkin’!

The Monacan Indians have a legend about the Natural Bridge.  They were part of the Siouan language group and were often at war with the Algonquian Indians who were a different language group living in Virginia.  During one battle the Algonquian Indians chased the Monacan Indians to a canyon with no way to cross.  As the enemy approached, they became desperate and prayed to their god.  Suddenly the natural bridge appeared!   They were all able to cross the canyon safely!

SOL Correlation:


2.3 The student will identify and compare changes in community life over time in terms of buildings, jobs, transportation, and population.


VS.8 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the reconstruction of Virginia following the Civil War by

  1. c)describing the importance of railroads, new industries, and the growth of cities to Virginia’s economic development


Science

2.7 The student will investigate and understand that weather and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings.  Key concepts include

  1. b)weathering and erosion of the land surface.


4.3 The student will investigate and understand the characteristics of electricity.  Key concepts include

b) basic circuits (open/closed, parallel/series);


5.7 The student will investigate and understand how the Earth’s surface is constantly changing. Key concepts include

a) the rock cycle including identification of rock types;

Valley & Ridge